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Size doesn’t matter: The war of the germs.

7 Sep

Obama to announce expanded plan to fight Ebola

(Headlines from USA today, September 16, 2014)

War is brewing.  The war to end all wars between Humankind and Mother Nature.    Don’t worry – dinosaurs won’t get us – cloning hasn’t been perfected.  And we seem to be doing a pretty good job of killing off other predators – in a gentlemanly way – by killing off their habitats.   To be sure, Mother Nature retaliates to our carbon barrage with draught and killer storms.  But I think we can’t see the real enemy.  Brilliant warriors – the germs’ll get us.

We’ve created germ warfare –  forming alliances with germs to kill  ‘enemies’.

And antibiotic soaps and sprays – to wage battle against germs themselves.

Prescribed antibiotics protect us from insurgent germs.

With the best of intentions, the good guys give support to the bad.

With the best of intentions, the good guys give support to the bad.

This war will be like others – the good will be sacrificed while killing the bad. The red cross will be called in for intestinal disaster relief aka probiotic/antibiotics – likely a shot in the arm for the economy.   And killing off the good, creates funding for the bad, making them stronger launching them into attack mode.  In subtle and not-so-subtle ways, these little guys are building strength as they sneak into our internal and external lives from run-away viruses to antibiotic resistant bacteria.

I can’t help but wonder:  How did something so good get to be so bad?   Is it bad PR?  A slur campaign?  Is it time to start a save the (good) germ campaign?

A ‘germ’ is not a four-letter word, not by definition:  All new ideas start with a ‘germ’ (of a good idea), the bud for future growth and development.   Too much of anything can be bad even when it’s good.  For some reason, technology springs to mind, including old-fashioned TV.  Germs, as new ideas and technology can be scary.  Remember when some thought TV would be the demise of society?  Until TV’s invaded living rooms around the country and took over our minds and hearts.

In face,  bad gut bacteria can alter minds and hearts in a way even binge watching ‘Game of Thrones’ can’t cure.  A scarier example: “Take Toxoplasma gondii, the single-celled parasite. When mice are infected by it, they suffer the grave misfortune of becoming attracted to cats.

OR,

read about how one doctor cured a teen of OCD:  Although plenty of questions remain, the benefits of using probiotics to treat human behavior are becoming increasingly obvious. Yogurts like Dannon’s Activia have been marketed with much success as a panacea for all of our intestinal ills. Other probiotic supplements have claimed to support immune health. Probiotics’ potential to treat human behavior is increasingly apparent, but will manufacturers one day toss an anxiety-fighting blend into their probiotic brews?

 

What do you think is hiding in cells as ‘fake’ proteins, awaiting the right time to inflict disease on an organism?  Viruses!  It gives whole new meaning to sleeper cells.    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092707.htm?utm_source=feedburner.

It’s not easy…  Kill off one germ, and others spring to life and/or adapt.  New generations of super germs are raised and recruited, able to resist determined antibiotics meant to kill them.    Those little guys must have the best R&D around to adapt and survive.  Is it any surprise killing one germy dictator  gives rise to a whole new breed of (bacterial) terrorists?

Ebola is the germ du jour.  Sweeping fear and disease across the world faster than a tweeted selfie at the Oscars.  Insidious little germs that can’t be caught, attacking silently and stealthily.  All reminding me of news of ISIS, and other (still small) terrorist groups brewing around the world…   Ah, human kind – with all our advances, there’s still no cure, no antibiotic for hate, terror, and injustice.   Germs are tough, resilient, and ambitious for survival.  We need a probiotic to balance needs.

 

Tweets spread faster than viruses/germs (so far).  I wasn't a carrier for this tweet - were you?

Tweets spread faster than viruses/germs (so far). I wasn’t a carrier for this tweet – were you?

Annihilating germs can’t be done with inoculations of mass destruction – that just creates new problems.  The best action – maybe the only immunity– it seems, is creating environments that don’t support the bad germs.  Got an infection?  Forget antibiotics.  Simply create an environment for the good guys to take over.    http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/herbal-antibiotic-alternatives.  A good guy environment must include food, jobs and safety from the bad guys.

How do we create a good guy environment?  Or once created, will we change the climate to favor the germs?   Can we win?  Is any war winnable?

 

 

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10 Characteristics to ensure a Big Bang Life!

21 Jun

Today’s the day to nurture and flaunt your inner scientist!

Do you diligently watch Big Bang Theory reruns?  Sneak into Star Trek conventions in strange cities?

While TV’s Big Bang nerds are cast as socially inept, it’s likely the coolest kids would be envious of their social network.

Like most things in life, it’s not what you know  but how you use it.

Time to rethink scientist’s bad rep.

Chemist from NYC Tech Day (google???)

Chemist from NYC Tech Day (google???)

Believing human behavior mimics the laws of science,  what makes a good scientist?  Is it biology or chemistry?  Alchemy at birth?

Here’s a compilation of the best scientists 10 characteristics.  For fun, insert your name for the word scientist:

1. Curiosity:  good scientists are insatiably curious about life’s ‘every things’.  I imagine their favorite word, like most 2-year old’s is ‘WHY’, marrying curiosity with child-like wonder.  (Hmm, picture the progeny!)  Curiosity can turn any experience into an adventure:  it prompts us to act, to take risks.  Though I wonder:  how will our ability to google everything impact our pursuit of curiosity?

Do we love George because he's a monkey - or because of his mischievious and enviable curiosity?

Do we love George because he’s a monkey – or because of his mischievous and enviable curiosity?

2. Open-minded and free of bias:  Great scientists are objective.  Imagine entering into situations and interactions without prejudice or tight and tiny opinions.  Open-minded scientists suspend judgement about findings until they are sure (and scientists really never are).  Wait – are eggs good or bad for us this week?  That’s one way to look at it.  Suspending judgement, like oil in water, allows scientists to continue observing and gathering data, while continuing their search for the best solution and opportunity.   Staying open-minded would lighten our load vs. carrying judgements and opinions.

3. Keen observer:  Scientists look and listen at information/data.  Never knowing what is most important, everything is considered and noted.  On the simplest level, it’s applying curiosity, watching and listening, for example, to loved ones behavior and actions, without bias.   Improved relationships anyone?

Observing life through a kaleidoscope

Observing life through a kaleidoscope

4. Resourceful:  Scientists look for avenues to explore in unexpected ways.  Have you ever seen some of those projects being funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) or the Federal Government?   For starters, I’m sure if I was a scientist I could get the NSF to fund my training for developing these characteristics in students!

5. Purposeful:  Scientists (often) believe they can change and improve the world through their research.  We’ll assume it’s not all about money or the plot of a Hollywood sic-fi thriller.  Imagine applying curiosity and resourcefulness to improve the world:  we could be styrofoam free, greenhouse gases would be relegated back to greenhouses, farmers applying the art of fallow could grow pesticide-free crops, and well-written sitcoms would edge out reality TV.  Perhaps we could  achieve world peace.

6. Good communicator:  While scientists are competitive due to funding and Nobel Prizes, they also need to communicate and share information, especially to us, non-scientists.  How is that doctors can’t explain a procedure or an ailment without an interpreter?  Sadly there are a handful of scientists who make it to the small screen and are deemed understandable:  Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carl Sagan to name a few.  As I see it, scientific rules and laws simply and clearly mimic our human nature (shameless plug here for all the posts to come on this blog!).  And while it’s a scientist’s challenge:  science is simple at its core.

7. Persistent:  Scientists don’t give up when proving their passion.   Consistently, they can pursue the same hypothesis for many, many, years, following good scientific protocol changing one variable at a time.  Over time they learn through experimentation, slowly building evidence to prove or disprove their hypothesis.  It’s about  following dreams – logically.  Unlike (me), constantly drenched by chasing rainbows (or butterflies?) muddying my purpose.

Ever notice how all the really cool science stuff is for kids?

Ever notice how all the really cool science stuff is for kids?

8. Creative:  Scientists, through observation and open-mindedness come up with new problems and new ways to problem-solve.   Einstein said it best:  “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”  Personally I am victim to old biases and protocols clogging my creativity.  Sadly, the great boxed science experiments on store-shelves and in classrooms all have a set protocol and a ‘right answer’.  Creativity uncovers MANY right answers.

9. Critical Thinker:  Of course to get the most bang from experimental buck, scientists know all about logical analysis. What’s most critical, is remaining emotion-free, a challenge to many of us.  This is problem solving blended with creativity and an exacting methodology, while examining the observed.

10. Courage:  Scientists ‘get’ being laughed at for beliefs and hypothesis (even outside of social situations).  Is the world really round?  Imagine holding strongly to a belief and persistently plotting to prove and accomplish your passion?   REAL courage is all about staying open-minded and living without judgement.

Perhaps what I love most about this list is how ubiquitous these characteristics are for any person interested in a full life.  Including every manager, parent, friend, and human being.  I would be a better person by being a ‘better scientist’.  An exploration I can apply purpose and curiosity to!

Sure, scientists may be ‘different’ than you or me, but it’s not what you have – or even who you are:  It’s all about what you do with the qualities you posses!.