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Size doesn’t matter: The war of the germs.

7 Sep

Obama to announce expanded plan to fight Ebola

(Headlines from USA today, September 16, 2014)

War is brewing.  The war to end all wars between Humankind and Mother Nature.    Don’t worry – dinosaurs won’t get us – cloning hasn’t been perfected.  And we seem to be doing a pretty good job of killing off other predators – in a gentlemanly way – by killing off their habitats.   To be sure, Mother Nature retaliates to our carbon barrage with draught and killer storms.  But I think we can’t see the real enemy.  Brilliant warriors – the germs’ll get us.

We’ve created germ warfare –  forming alliances with germs to kill  ‘enemies’.

And antibiotic soaps and sprays – to wage battle against germs themselves.

Prescribed antibiotics protect us from insurgent germs.

With the best of intentions, the good guys give support to the bad.

With the best of intentions, the good guys give support to the bad.

This war will be like others – the good will be sacrificed while killing the bad. The red cross will be called in for intestinal disaster relief aka probiotic/antibiotics – likely a shot in the arm for the economy.   And killing off the good, creates funding for the bad, making them stronger launching them into attack mode.  In subtle and not-so-subtle ways, these little guys are building strength as they sneak into our internal and external lives from run-away viruses to antibiotic resistant bacteria.

I can’t help but wonder:  How did something so good get to be so bad?   Is it bad PR?  A slur campaign?  Is it time to start a save the (good) germ campaign?

A ‘germ’ is not a four-letter word, not by definition:  All new ideas start with a ‘germ’ (of a good idea), the bud for future growth and development.   Too much of anything can be bad even when it’s good.  For some reason, technology springs to mind, including old-fashioned TV.  Germs, as new ideas and technology can be scary.  Remember when some thought TV would be the demise of society?  Until TV’s invaded living rooms around the country and took over our minds and hearts.

In face,  bad gut bacteria can alter minds and hearts in a way even binge watching ‘Game of Thrones’ can’t cure.  A scarier example: “Take Toxoplasma gondii, the single-celled parasite. When mice are infected by it, they suffer the grave misfortune of becoming attracted to cats.

OR,

read about how one doctor cured a teen of OCD:  Although plenty of questions remain, the benefits of using probiotics to treat human behavior are becoming increasingly obvious. Yogurts like Dannon’s Activia have been marketed with much success as a panacea for all of our intestinal ills. Other probiotic supplements have claimed to support immune health. Probiotics’ potential to treat human behavior is increasingly apparent, but will manufacturers one day toss an anxiety-fighting blend into their probiotic brews?

 

What do you think is hiding in cells as ‘fake’ proteins, awaiting the right time to inflict disease on an organism?  Viruses!  It gives whole new meaning to sleeper cells.    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140707092707.htm?utm_source=feedburner.

It’s not easy…  Kill off one germ, and others spring to life and/or adapt.  New generations of super germs are raised and recruited, able to resist determined antibiotics meant to kill them.    Those little guys must have the best R&D around to adapt and survive.  Is it any surprise killing one germy dictator  gives rise to a whole new breed of (bacterial) terrorists?

Ebola is the germ du jour.  Sweeping fear and disease across the world faster than a tweeted selfie at the Oscars.  Insidious little germs that can’t be caught, attacking silently and stealthily.  All reminding me of news of ISIS, and other (still small) terrorist groups brewing around the world…   Ah, human kind – with all our advances, there’s still no cure, no antibiotic for hate, terror, and injustice.   Germs are tough, resilient, and ambitious for survival.  We need a probiotic to balance needs.

 

Tweets spread faster than viruses/germs (so far).  I wasn't a carrier for this tweet - were you?

Tweets spread faster than viruses/germs (so far). I wasn’t a carrier for this tweet – were you?

Annihilating germs can’t be done with inoculations of mass destruction – that just creates new problems.  The best action – maybe the only immunity– it seems, is creating environments that don’t support the bad germs.  Got an infection?  Forget antibiotics.  Simply create an environment for the good guys to take over.    http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/herbal-antibiotic-alternatives.  A good guy environment must include food, jobs and safety from the bad guys.

How do we create a good guy environment?  Or once created, will we change the climate to favor the germs?   Can we win?  Is any war winnable?

 

 

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Slippery slope thoughts: my neck, mitosis, and climate change

11 Apr

Oops this was published too quickly…

I woke up this morning thinking about my neck.

Specifically, as you might imagine, wrinkles.  Those horizontal lines which shout and share my age.  A seemingly  inauspicious way to begin a day, right?  That same day which only ‘ages’ from dawn till dusk, yet is the same ‘age’ from year to year.  The birth of the new (calendar) year spawns a growth spurt resulting in longer days until the summer solstice, when as if exhausted by the hullabaloo of summer’s start, begins a steady decline to wizened daylight until after the winter’s solstice and the whole cycle starts again.

My neck, as luck would (not) have it, does not follow this same rule of nature.

The decline and rebirth of the day (and year) has an external cause:  the earth’s rotation and tilt around the sun.  But my aging neck is internal…..

The visible signs of aging across living organisms isn’t equal.  Talk about ringing in a new year:  no species ages like trees, growing taller, more majestic and more productive with each passing year.   Trees’ years may be imagined by their height, yet they have to die and be cut open to count  the rings marking their lives.  I know trees are vital to keeping me vibrant – even more than my skin care regiment – but it’s still not fair.  It’s certainly a slight from nature that trees alone not only increase oxygen output as they age – and are more valuable for their beauty.

Spite:  is this the reason humankind is out to kill all the trees on the planet?  Because they age effortlessly and gracefully and the cosmetic companies (and climate change deniers) don’t want a reminder they are not keeping up?  No, that sounds too ridiculous even for this early in the morning.

 

listverse.com Ah, talk about a species who ages well!

listverse.com
Ah, talk about a species who ages well!

I sometimes think the strides in anti-aging treatments far exceed those in alternative energy sources and cancer cures.

Nora Ephron's spirit was as solid as a redwood and she still felt bad about her neck….

Nora Ephron’s spirit was as solid as a redwood and she still felt bad about her neck….

 

As reason pulls me from mirror to computer, I remind myself aging is simple science.  It’s mitosis or mitotic imbalance or epidermal (cell) retirement.  I possess as many names for mitotic  decline as anti-aging oils in my bathroom.

But it’s not just that my skin cells up and die – it’s that there are no new ones to take their place.  It’s the imbalance of out with the old, but no new ones to plump back in their face – I mean place.

Simple science is all about equilibrium.   If new cells don’t replace old cells than aging occurs.  Matter cannot be created nor destroyed has nothing to do with skin cells – we’re talking biology not physics here.

Our aging all about the balance of new cells replacing old cells due to mitosis.

Simple science is the reason for trees regal aging:  the oxygen/carbon di-oxide cycle or balance of trees taking our carbon dioxide waste and exhaling out oxygen.  The same oxygen we need for vitality and life is because of the trees that take in our exhaust carbon dioxide.

Our faces mirror the need for balance everywhere in our lives.  Economically, if more money goes out of our wallets than goes in, we experience a financial ‘death’ = debt.  If we take more than we give to friends there is relationship death.  If we eat more calories than we burn, our skinny jeans are buried in the donation bin.

Life is all about balance and getting what we need.  Trees remind us our age on the inside is (and can be) projected out.  Regardless of age, we can still bloom and give life.

Of course we need trees for more than reminders about graceful aging.

 

The oxygen/carbon-dioxide cycle is a normal cycle (like mitosis).  Destroying the planet’s forests  unnaturally destroys this cycle.  Cutting down trees is aging the planet (aka climate change) and plaguing our health.   But this we can do something about.  Really.  Restoring this balance is the simplest thing we can do to combat global warming.

Personally, I can live with wrinkles….  Without oxygen, not so much….

Earth day is weeks away.  Let’s celebrate by planting trees.

Flash to Fallow: Mother Nature’s 5 Financial Lessons

4 Oct

This post originally appeared on blogher’s ‘Diary of a Single Professional Woman’

Nature is rich – in resources – just like I want to be.

I often say ‘Everything I need to know about the economy and life I learned from Mother Nature’.   As fall sends nature’s flash into fallow (or dormancy), it’s the perfect time to learn from her (save, spend, grow) sustainability plan.   After all, she’s been around a long time – so what does she know that we don’t?  And more importantly what can we learn so we spring open along with the crocuses come April?   Here’s my simplistic, and metaphoric thoughts on ‘environmental economics’ to kick around along with the leaves.

seedling

Fall may feel like an end rather than a start – look out the window and nature looks like it is dying.  Ha!  Mother Nature is transitioning from her extroverted spring/summer flash to a well-deserved introverted fall/winter recovery time.  Her withdrawal of energy allows time to reflect, rejuvenate, and save for spring’s big bloom roll-out.

Shorter days likely darken our mood.  Especially as color leaves our external environment.   Green, in particular colors our thoughts – and the U.S. dollar or greenback, that universal currency.  Simply:

Lush, rich, life = Green

Green = Money

Green = Nature

Nature = Resources

Resources = Money

Money = Nature

Nature = Resources = Life

Yet, when it comes to linking the economy with the environment, it seems we are colorblind, too often living in the red.  I think we need to ask: which resources are needed for life?

For a brief period of time, I thought it was a ‘red handbag’.  As you’ve read,  it was a temporary want.  Sure, I love ‘stuff’ that makes my apartment home.  But honestly, I don’t need it – I just want it.   The only resources any of us really need for life are oxygen, water, and food.  Resources only nature can provide contrary to food package’ ingredient listings.

I say our challenge is working with Mother Nature for our needs while satisfying our human nature with our wants.

It’s asking:  What Would Mother Nature Do (WWMND) for economic success?   She’d say begin with her 5 steps:

1.  Balance:    Mother Nature has obviously spent plenty of time on a playground seesaw.  She understands the need to maintain balance even while going up and down.   She uses what she has – while saving a little for the future.    Mother Nature foregoes debt, once her bottom line turns from green to red, she catapults into endangerment/extinction.

Lesson:   We may become morally, emotionally, financially bankrupt overusing resources, causing our internal peace (balance) to become extinct.  Live under your means to keep your personal seesaw going.   Debt drives your energy, emotions, finances and goodwill into the red.  And remember: There is no plastic – no credit cards – found in nature.

Maintaining balance, like on a see-saw can seem like child's play.
Maintaining balance, like on a see-saw can seem like child’s play.

2.  Save:   Mother Nature saves everything including those piles of leaves in your yard.   This is not hoarding.  She reduces those dead leaves/blooms by recycling (decomposers de-clutter causing decaying leaves to smell like a frat house bathroom on a Sunday morning) and reusing (notice those leaves are gone by spring – broken up and back into the soil like using old clothes to make a quilt).  All this saving leads to new blooms – and a reminder that the future is no predictor of the past.

Lesson:  use what you have to grow your future – like with an IRA.    And don’t bother raking those leaves in your yard!

3.  Spew seeds:  Seeds are nature’s C.D.’s (certificates of deposit), little packets of possibility to ensure future growth.   They even sound similar!   Seeds, like C.D.’s only open at the right time, in the right place, and the right conditions – and they are supported by all those unused seeds and leaves that ‘die’.  There are even special seeds that open during a forest fire to ensure that tree species survival.  Kinda like emergency C.D.’s/funds.  

Lesson:  save for emergencies as well as the future – though the stock market provides better returns than C.D.’s.

Nobody would touch this funky burr-covered seed till it was already  open (like all CD's should be!)
Nobody would touch this funky burr-covered seed till it was already open (like all CD’s should be!)

4.  Diversification: The healthiest forest and gardens are filled with diverse trees that play host to lots of different bugs, and are called home by lots of birds.   Having only one species like Dutch Elm (on decorative paths) found one ‘sick’ tree caused them all to die.

Lesson:  Diversification of your holdings maintains balance and growth so even if your ‘Dutch Elm’-like stock tanks/dies, other stock species survive.

5.  Be sustainable:  Mother Nature thrives because everything she has is used and supports everything else, even though it may seem to be in conflict.

Lesson:  Invest in things that feed your future.  Material things that overwhelm you and end up in landfills throw you off-balance and leave nothing to decompose – unlike the leaves left in your yard that will decompose to nurture spewed seeds.  Experiential investments always leave you with seeds or kernels of thought and growth.

Part of the Coney Island boardwalk by the NY Aquarium
Part of the Coney Island boardwalk by the NY Aquarium

 Mother Nature’s 5 lessons keep you blooming in all seasons:

  • This holiday season, stay green and out of the red by matching  spending with your values (http://communicationessentials.wordpress.com/values-activity/) and keep you growing.
  • Make every day is your special Valentine’s Day by making black the new red.  Love yourself by loving your finances and living under your means to live fully in the future.

And really, just one more thing to think about:  We may say money is the root of all evil, and we should add, resources are the cause for conflicts personally and globally...

Meanwhile, what steps will you take to support your spring blooms?

My Revised Scientific Method: it’s not just for scientists anymore

1 Aug

“Our species can only survive if we have obstacles to overcome… without them to strengthen us, we will weaken and die.”
(Metamorphosis)  James T. Kirk, USS Enterprise Captain, Star Trek (the original!)

Ask any drama queen (or king):  creating challenges is fun.    Politicians/economists/scientists jockey for position on viable solutions to

Time to "phaser-out" problems!  http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Starfleet_insignia

Time to “phaser-out” problems! http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/Starfleet_insignia

industrialization’s created problems.  From the mortgage debacle/financial crash, climate change, obesity, cancer, hate-crimes, and illiteracy, obstacles are as plentiful as the stars.

The real obstacles which fully capture our attention are individual and personal:   from getting out of bed and making it through the day, connecting with teens and silently feuding partners, finding a partner, finding a job, paying for groceries, dealing with a difficult boss or mother, deciding which brand of toothpaste is best or who to vote for on American Idol – the list goes on.    We can’t deal with the big obstacles until our real ones – the personal ones – weighing us down are shrugged off .

Thing is, solving these small problems are as difficult as the big ones.  And that saying?  “Don’t sweat the small stuff.  It’s all small stuff”.  Much easier said than done.

I say:  The scientific method:  it’s not just for scientists anymore.

photo-85

Yup, that method we re-learned in every science class is one we use daily for real challenges – kinda.   Though there’s likely to be more madness than reason to our method.

If you’re about to say “yes, but…”, give your knee-jerk response a rest.   Scientific experimentation is all about DISproving, making scientists the original “dis-sers”.

As a reminder “The Method’s ” steps: Identify what’s bothering you (problem), form a reason why (hypothesis), figure out what to change and action to take  (experiment),  see if it works (observation), declare victory or try again (conclude or start over).  We do that all the time, right?  Yet….

Society teaches (for the most part) there is a right answer – in the back of the book, like in science class:  

By the time you reach age ‘x’, you should have achieved ‘y’.

The media bombards with what accomplishments are needed to get a good life grade.  The answers are wrapped up in the “American Dream”!  My hypothesis: solving for that “right” answer keeps us awake and without dreams.

I prefer: “The good thing about the American Dream is you get a new one very night” (Michael, “The Office).

Today’s the perfect day to create a new American dream using a revised scientific method?    Solve for the right ‘y’ (and why).

Instead of the problem:  ‘How do I get what I’m supposed to have?’

And the hypothesis: ‘I am doing ‘a’ or ‘b’ wrong.’

Reframe the problem to:

‘What is right for ME?’

plos blogs diverse perspectives on science and medicine http://blogsplos-orgblog20110506the\secretofexperimentaldesign.jpg

plos blogs diverse perspectives on science and medicine http://blogsplos-orgblog20110506the\secretofexperimentaldesign.jpg

Here are 5 (revised) steps based on my personal problem-solving experiments.   No goggles or safety equipment needed.

  1. Listen to your body to identify the problem:  the body never lies.  Does your back tighten when it comes time to go to work?  Do your fists clench when talk turns to money?  There’s a problem when aches and pains appear at the thought or mention or appearance of a defined “obstacle”.  Do you dive into a super-sized bag of chips before a family event or when you have a deadline approaching?  Pay attention!  Start by recording when you feel that “tinge”.  For example, keep a food journal to keep track of overriding emotions causing you to devour the contents of your refrigerator.
  2. Look inside to uncover your hypothesis, the source of the problem.  Identify your values and how well those values are met  http://communicationessentials.wordpress.com/values-activity/.  For example if you inhale a pint of ice cream every time a credit card bill arrives, identify which value is NOT being met as in:  My finances are stressing me out because I don’t feel independent (value), causing me to overeat.
  3. Make a plan to take action.  Action is the experimental heart and focuses on how to meet the value (independence) not the ice cream inhalation.  Experimental (financial) plans may include contacting a debt or financial coach, setting up a saving/payment plan while developing a mantra when your fingers are at the cyberspace checkout button such as:  “this (item) will whittle away my independence which makes me unhappy”.  Create several steps to take to get your value met and use them for at least 21 days to create a new habit.
  4. Take stock of your situation.  Maintaining independence through debt-free finances is fairly easy to assess when a bill arrives:  can you breathe?  Does the thought of the balance throw your internal equilibrium off-balance by sending you to the kitchen or elsewhere?
  5. And repeat.  If your symptoms continue – try a new plan of action and ask for help with problem-solving.  If your experiment was successful, bravo.  Now it’s time to assess other body reactions to unmet values and identify what actions will remove obstacles and calm your body.

How will tapping into your inner scientist help you?  Which step can you apply to your daily obstacles to uncover a winning solution?

Exploring our own nature as humans is a good time to shelve our human nature fears, especially the fear of failure.   Remember, many of the best solutions are found by mistake after doing “the wrong thing”.   Successful experimentation is all about failure, learning from mistakes and moving forward one step even if you’ve gone backwards two (steps).   Personally, I embody the scientific notion that taking a risk and failure is an experimental “win”.   Just go boldly where your values tell you to go!

  Enjoy the journey and keep a data log!

Going up! Running express from 350 ppm to 400 ppm: Is it worth the risk?

8 Jul

You’re running late.  Standing at the elevator, you push the button what feels like a bazillion times, fully aware that it won’t make it come any faster.  The familiar ping of the arriving car brings a wave of relief – until the doors open.  The elevator is packed tighter than  proverbial sardines in a can.  There’s a sliver of light between sweaty bodies and bulky briefcases –  just enough inches for you.

basia961-webd-pl.

basia961-webd-pl.

Fitting 12 oz. in an 8 oz. glass, there’s need for those compression storage bags to fit you all in comfortably.  Arranging your body in an uncomfortable angle, you mumble apologies and giggle, your eyes avoiding others.  Your bodies are  superimposed in intimate configurations.  For distraction, you fixate on the weight limit warning, boldly posted in the upper right hand corner.  Involuntarily your eyes, the only part of your body able to move, dart around the two square foot space, mentally adding up real vs. driver license weights.  Horror mixes with fear: realistically, you should all be crashing to your deaths right about now.

So when the door opens do you run out screaming for safety?  Or do you inhale and sidle up even closer to those nameless weighted bodies from the 7th floor to make room for the next dangerous addition to your safety violating can?  After all, this is a daily occurrence.  Besides, how often do overweight elevators crash at warp speed to a deadly destination for its inhabitants?  Your worries dissipate with thoughts of Chicken Little-like elevator inspectors.

Arriving safely at your destination, a bit late, a lot rumpled, you mentally run through all the warnings that never come to pass:  the 2012 Mayan calendar,  the dangers of high fructose corn syrup, the hazards of eggs or is it coffee this week?

Then there’s those environmentalists crying ‘wolf’, or rather:  global warming! global warning!  Is there any real difference between an elevator holding too much weight and the atmosphere holding too much carbon dioxide?

The CO2 limit in the right hand corner of the sky reads 350 parts per million (ppm).  That’s the safe amount of carbon dioxide in the mix of ‘air’ to allow life to continue as we know it.  But climate scientists lecture our ‘weight’  is now at a rip-roaring 400 ppm.

That air you’re breathing is CO2 obese.  Can we blame CO2 for personal obesity too?

400 ppm – we should be grabbing our chests and grasping for oxygen.  If the scientists are more accurate in their predictions than elevator inspections.  Which clearly they are not.  Because we are still here, sweltering in triple digit temps, disaster weary after hurricanes and tornadoes rip through formerly safe havens.

Global Warning!

Yet we can each make the choice to step off an overweight elevator.  When it comes to a safe gas mix in the air we breathe, there is no escape.  Though we escape from record-breaking heat in air-conditioned shelters, in air-conditioned cars.  AC that inches up the CO2 reading further.

It’s about risk.  We can always take the stairs.   In fact taking stairs and walking will reduce obesity.  Using less AC (the smallest of starts) will reduce CO2 levels.  (And wouldn’t it be nice to do away with plastic!)

There is no substitute for oxygen and healthy breathing air.  No substitute for balance in the CO2 cycle.  Not unless we want our species to go crashing down.

We might be safe for now.  Are you willing to risk your kids or grandkids future?

Speak up for alternative energy.  Recycle.  Support environmental groups.  The earth has taken care of us, now it’s time for us to take care of her.

350.org

Sierra Club

World Wildlife Fund

Heifer International

These are just a few…. share your favorite group and what they do!

Too much of a good thing: 3 things to learn from corn

27 Jun

“Americans are already paying the price of inaction,” he (President Barak Obama on coal power) said.

“Our planet is changing in ways that will have profound impacts on all humankind.”

corn

It’s hot.  I mean really hot and I walk around feeling soppy.   I have to admit I’ve never gotten the whole ‘ain’t summer grand’ thing.

Growing up, it didn’t feel as hot as it is now.  We survived with fans – even in  out cars.    Though things always feel different when you’re a kid.

There’s a reason fans were enough back then:  since 1970, the earth’s temp has risen more than 1 degree Fahrenheit.  If you like this hotter world we’re melting into, stick around another 80 years or so.  Global scientists predict the temperature will rise about 11 degrees F – IF we keep burning coal, oil and fracked natural gas.

Of course not every area will suffer equally:  small Pacific islanders won’t suffer – they’ll just no longer exist.

It’s hard to imagine the power of a rising ocean level sweeping away cities, though hurricane Sandy gave us a sneak preview.   Honest now:   have you bought additional rain gear in the last year?   Will building big, big sea walls protect hurricane-challenged areas like NYC?

But it’s really corn I want to talk.  That same treat that reminds us it’s summer in the best possible way:  grilled, boiled, buttered, salted or plain.   Then there’s full planet empty plateseverything I didn’t know (we’ll just stick to corn for now) until I read  Lester Brown’s ‘Staple Crops Vulnerable to Rising Temperatures’ in Heifer’s World Ark this morning.

Remember the saying:  thigh high by the 4th of July as a good sign for corn.  As the world blazes,  rising temps will interfere with our corn growth spurt.

I know it sounds ‘corny’, or should I say there’s more than a kernel of truth in it, but it’s all about sex, or more specifically pollination.

Pollination is the most vulnerable part of corn’s life cycle.  Those silky strands stripped off the cob, sometimes right in the store, are each attached to a single kernel.  Each strand needs a grain of pollen to fall on it, that grain journeying to the kernel for fertilization and our ultimate delight.   Too much heat?  The strands dry out, thwarting all hopes of fertilization.  Hmm, I would never have thought about the similarities of human and corn reproduction.

Then there’s sun stroke/shock:  those high temps that leave me wilted and my hair curly, dehydrates the plants.  Just like we need to drink more water in the heat, so does corn.  (sans plastic bottles)

Unable to hide in the shade, plants curl curl their leaves to reduce sun exposure.  Less sun means less photosynthesis.  Less photosynthesis means less carbon-dioxide absorption – and less oxygen production.

For those who need to keep score: Greenhouse gasses: 1, summer picnic: 0

The sun gives life.  The sun can take away life.  Here are 3 things to learn from corn’s challenge:

1.  It’s all about balance:  or equilibrium, or homeostasis.  Even if like sun we think we need more of something.  Too much work burns us out – get it.  Too much play can leave our brains soppy.  Overspending can thwart hopes of fertilizing retirement, home or a new car.  We can take steps to regain balance in our life (usually).  But we can also take steps to balance adding hot air to the atmosphere.

2.  Every action has an equal and opposite reaction:  Mixing biology and physics is enough to get anyone drunk.  If something is good for us, more MUST be better, but like sun and crops, instead of increasing yield, it decreases it.  It’s like thinking a bigger house will add joy, when it can also just add more stress.  Or, how technology makes our life easier – absolutely makes it more complex.  Changing one thing mean something else will too.  Just not in the way you think.

3.  It’s personal: Optimally and often, when good things happen, they spill into all areas of life.  It’s as if there is a cosmic synergy that sparks and connects all our dreams.  Yet I realize each part of us is tethered to the outside world by a vulnerable silky strand.  Each strand needs to be nurtured to fertilize, before yielding a bushel of dreams.  If the right job, love, or opportunity isn’t attracting the right pollinator, there is one variable that isn’t ‘right’?    Sometimes it’s too easy to get caught up in the big picture and forget the little details that make that picture come alive.

A field of corn is similar to a networking event.   There needs to be balance (between listening and talking), going to too many  events can be as bad as going to none (burn out), and, it’s all being in the right place at the right time to meet the right ‘pollinator’/organization that will yield results.

Let’s respect the power of nature – and the added power we gift her by our actions!

Enjoy this weekend’s picnics (and corn on the cob!)

10 Characteristics to ensure a Big Bang Life!

21 Jun

Today’s the day to nurture and flaunt your inner scientist!

Do you diligently watch Big Bang Theory reruns?  Sneak into Star Trek conventions in strange cities?

While TV’s Big Bang nerds are cast as socially inept, it’s likely the coolest kids would be envious of their social network.

Like most things in life, it’s not what you know  but how you use it.

Time to rethink scientist’s bad rep.

Chemist from NYC Tech Day (google???)

Chemist from NYC Tech Day (google???)

Believing human behavior mimics the laws of science,  what makes a good scientist?  Is it biology or chemistry?  Alchemy at birth?

Here’s a compilation of the best scientists 10 characteristics.  For fun, insert your name for the word scientist:

1. Curiosity:  good scientists are insatiably curious about life’s ‘every things’.  I imagine their favorite word, like most 2-year old’s is ‘WHY’, marrying curiosity with child-like wonder.  (Hmm, picture the progeny!)  Curiosity can turn any experience into an adventure:  it prompts us to act, to take risks.  Though I wonder:  how will our ability to google everything impact our pursuit of curiosity?

Do we love George because he's a monkey - or because of his mischievious and enviable curiosity?

Do we love George because he’s a monkey – or because of his mischievous and enviable curiosity?

2. Open-minded and free of bias:  Great scientists are objective.  Imagine entering into situations and interactions without prejudice or tight and tiny opinions.  Open-minded scientists suspend judgement about findings until they are sure (and scientists really never are).  Wait – are eggs good or bad for us this week?  That’s one way to look at it.  Suspending judgement, like oil in water, allows scientists to continue observing and gathering data, while continuing their search for the best solution and opportunity.   Staying open-minded would lighten our load vs. carrying judgements and opinions.

3. Keen observer:  Scientists look and listen at information/data.  Never knowing what is most important, everything is considered and noted.  On the simplest level, it’s applying curiosity, watching and listening, for example, to loved ones behavior and actions, without bias.   Improved relationships anyone?

Observing life through a kaleidoscope

Observing life through a kaleidoscope

4. Resourceful:  Scientists look for avenues to explore in unexpected ways.  Have you ever seen some of those projects being funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) or the Federal Government?   For starters, I’m sure if I was a scientist I could get the NSF to fund my training for developing these characteristics in students!

5. Purposeful:  Scientists (often) believe they can change and improve the world through their research.  We’ll assume it’s not all about money or the plot of a Hollywood sic-fi thriller.  Imagine applying curiosity and resourcefulness to improve the world:  we could be styrofoam free, greenhouse gases would be relegated back to greenhouses, farmers applying the art of fallow could grow pesticide-free crops, and well-written sitcoms would edge out reality TV.  Perhaps we could  achieve world peace.

6. Good communicator:  While scientists are competitive due to funding and Nobel Prizes, they also need to communicate and share information, especially to us, non-scientists.  How is that doctors can’t explain a procedure or an ailment without an interpreter?  Sadly there are a handful of scientists who make it to the small screen and are deemed understandable:  Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carl Sagan to name a few.  As I see it, scientific rules and laws simply and clearly mimic our human nature (shameless plug here for all the posts to come on this blog!).  And while it’s a scientist’s challenge:  science is simple at its core.

7. Persistent:  Scientists don’t give up when proving their passion.   Consistently, they can pursue the same hypothesis for many, many, years, following good scientific protocol changing one variable at a time.  Over time they learn through experimentation, slowly building evidence to prove or disprove their hypothesis.  It’s about  following dreams – logically.  Unlike (me), constantly drenched by chasing rainbows (or butterflies?) muddying my purpose.

Ever notice how all the really cool science stuff is for kids?

Ever notice how all the really cool science stuff is for kids?

8. Creative:  Scientists, through observation and open-mindedness come up with new problems and new ways to problem-solve.   Einstein said it best:  “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”  Personally I am victim to old biases and protocols clogging my creativity.  Sadly, the great boxed science experiments on store-shelves and in classrooms all have a set protocol and a ‘right answer’.  Creativity uncovers MANY right answers.

9. Critical Thinker:  Of course to get the most bang from experimental buck, scientists know all about logical analysis. What’s most critical, is remaining emotion-free, a challenge to many of us.  This is problem solving blended with creativity and an exacting methodology, while examining the observed.

10. Courage:  Scientists ‘get’ being laughed at for beliefs and hypothesis (even outside of social situations).  Is the world really round?  Imagine holding strongly to a belief and persistently plotting to prove and accomplish your passion?   REAL courage is all about staying open-minded and living without judgement.

Perhaps what I love most about this list is how ubiquitous these characteristics are for any person interested in a full life.  Including every manager, parent, friend, and human being.  I would be a better person by being a ‘better scientist’.  An exploration I can apply purpose and curiosity to!

Sure, scientists may be ‘different’ than you or me, but it’s not what you have – or even who you are:  It’s all about what you do with the qualities you posses!.

From Science to Self

4 Sep

How’s your experimental procedure these days?

Which side of the test tube are you on in your current experiment?

I’ve always thought of coming up with new ideas like cooking:  messy, tasty meals are best, and recipes are optional.

It may have started with a right-brained implementation of the scientific

Amazing how it is probably easier to hold the brain than have a handle on the ideas and thoughts (the brain) holds.

method, or, maybe it was my left brain making sense of a management or communication mystery.  Regardless, my brain’s natural urge to create balance uncovered Human/Nature Concepts or how human behavior mimics the laws of science and nature.

Admittedly, this isn’t rocket science – but more metaphorical science.  After all, there is a reason why so many metaphors about human behavior refer to science and nature.

And what is more important to us than understanding our own behavior?  Even though mastering ‘ourselves’ seems as mysterious as E=mc2.  By the

From Berlin’s 2006 Walk of Ideas. The equation that captures the secret to change – or at least in Human/Nature terms

way, I’ll discuss later – not so difficult to understand -really.

To thrive, we need to understand ourselves.

To survive, we must understand and live within the laws of nature.  To me, it makes sense to learn these ‘needs’ together.

Understanding both may be hard, but learning about them doesn’t need to be a ‘hard’ science.

Shaking out the science and Mother Nature’s laws along with the life basics Daniel Goleman coined as emotional intelligence or EQ, I’ll explore:

Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence brilliantly captures all of those life skills needed for success – skills that separate the leaders from the wannabees. Perhaps Human/Nature will spark a new type of scientific intelligence, one we need to co-exist with the planet (and ourselves).

  • Finances and the Economy
  • Conflict
  • Inheritance
  • Guest Etiquette
  • The Chemistry of Creativity
  • Seeds
  • Balance and Equilibrium
  • Career advice
  • Preparing for the future
  • Teamwork
  • Sleep
  • Naked Identity
  • And more!

Starting September 24th, I’ll be posting on Mondays.

Challenge me:  let me know if you have a thought or question you want explored from either end of the spectrum!